Stonehenge

Stonehenge

A World Heritage Site Built Around 5000 Years Ago.
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About Stonehenge Attractions

If you think the prehistoric monumental site of Stonehenge is for the budding historians or for the travellers interested in historical sites, well, it’s quite really not so with Stonehenge London, which is a perfect site for visitors of all ages and professional backgrounds with a keen interest in stories. On strolling around the mammoth sized stones aligned in a pattern of circle, you might wonder what purpose would they originally serve? The story behind it, which is popularly known, is that the site was a graveyard, but it is not the only story proposed by historians. The most endearing aspect of the site that attracts visitors during the summer and winter solstices is around its engineering. The positioning of uprightly standing sarsens (the large stones) is such that they trace the movement of the rotational cycles of earth and moon. Already feeling lost in the stories of these magical stones?

Well, you would get to listen more at the Salisbury Museum and Wiltshire museum. The Gnomus, a friendly giant at Stonehenge London would tell you about the stories of the origin of earth along with that of these stones as you follow him on the trail of finding his age-old friend. Help him out by looking around, for he can’t bend down due to his large stature.

Highlights of Stonehenge

Stonehenge
  • Stonehenge London is 5,000 years old. It was built around 2500 BCE in the Neolithic period in several stages, the last construction happening around 700 BCE.
  • The engineering of the monument is such that it traces the movement of the sun and other planets. The beauty of dawn and dusk enhances multifolds when experienced standing behind sarsens and taking a stone circle around.
  • Stonehenge England is a prehistoric monument site whose history still puzzles the historians.
  • Stonehenge is a UNESCO World Heritage site
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History of Stonehenge

Stonehenge
Before Stonehenge

The historical importance of the site comes from its sites that were erected in the Mesolithic period between 8500 and 7000 BC. These sites are the earliest structures and located in the immediate area of the Stonehenge where visitors would be exposed to five or six pits which appear to hold a ‘totem-pole like’ like post. The chalk downland area of Stonehenge must have been uncovered unlike the rest of England. The presence of certain monuments of rectangular earthworks in the area, as per historians, had influenced the later location of Stonehenge.

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Stonehenge
The Earliest Monument

The outline of the structure of Stonehenge London must have started with the earliest construction of a circular ditch with an inner and outer bank around 3000 BC. The circular area outlined has a diameter of 100 meters and two entrances, and inside of the bank of the circular area has about 56 potholes also called Aubrey Holes. The Heel Stones and the North Barrow, a low mound structure, belongs to the earliest layout planned for the Stonehenge as well. As visitors visit the structure and ask about the utilization of the Aubrey Holes or pit holes, surprisingly, these holes pose a mystery to the historians as well. Though they were certainly used as grave sites, important acts were also happening around them as well.

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Stonehenge
The Stone Settings

Around the time period of 2500 BC, the initial settings of stonehenge London had been laid out in the centre of the monument. Stones were being used during this time period to mark out the territory over which Stonehenges would be uprected in future. The two types of stones used in the construction were the larger sarsens and the smaller bluestones. At the centre of the monument, stones were laid out, the sarsens close to the entrance were erected as well as the four station stones on the periphery were mounted. In the future all the construction would be done inside the banks of the big circle marked by the ancestors. Therefore, about 200 or 300 years later, bluestones at the centre were rearranged into a circular formation.

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Stonehenge
After Stonehenge was built

Stonehenge England is one of few of the landmark distinctions that makes up for the time period of 2400 BC when historically important developments were happening. It was during this time that new styles of ‘Beaker’ pottery and the knowledge of metalworking had been developed. From the early Bronze Age, historians have unearthed a wide concentration of round barrows in Britain around the Stonehenge. Of the several barrows found in the area, many have deliberately been located on hilltops, such as those on King Barrow Ridge. The sarsens have been engraved with drawings of axes which symbolises power or status and historians claim that these were related to the round barrow burials located nearby.

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Later History

As the bronze age passed by, the interest in construction of the building of the Stonehenge London drew. However, more communal efforts were put in the creation of the fields. Only in the Iron Age, around 700 BC, was the major hillfort constructed named as Vespasian’s Camp, about 1 miles away from the location of Stonehenge London. Archeologists have suggested that this structure overlooking the river Avon had been built for the purpose of rituals by Romano-British people. The last construction happening in and around the Stonehenge is the establishment of the small town of Amesbury in 6th century AD, after the Saxon period, when the neighbourhood was taken over by a sheep husbandry.

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Stonehenge
Stonehenge in the 20th & 21th Century

The site has been structurally disturbed by the army activities conducted in the area after a vast tract of the land on Salisbury Plain was bought by the British army in 1897. The construction of barracks, firing ranges, field hospitals and other establishments have a destructive impact on the site. Efforts since then have been put to mend all the after-effects of the unplanned construction. An alter effect of construction in the region has been that of introduction of the place to a variety of public interested in exploring historical sites of the country. Individual efforts like that of Sir Edmund Antrobus have paid a good contribution in the maintenance of the site.

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Things To See And Do at Stonehenge

Stonehenge
Gnomus at Stonehenge

Gnoums are the friendly giants responsible for taking care of the Earth and they are the Guardian of wildlife. They have been looking after the planet since the beginning of its formation. On your trip to Stonehenge London, it might be possible that you bump into these enormous creatures looking for their friends who have come from the Neolithic Age. As he goes after his friend, ask him about the history of the stones and the construction of the site for he is even older than the stones and the site itself. Give him space to tread smoothly, as the site looks like a small model of little stones against his height of 4 metres.

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Solstice

The science behind the placing of the sarsen stones enables people to experience the skies in an iconic way. It allows them to learn the movement of the sun, the moon and the planets as you get to observe them on the days of the solstice. The solar alignment is distinguishably beautiful and soulful on the summer solstice when the sun rays hit the heart of the Stonehenge London. Stand in the enclosure on the entrance, on winter solstice, facing the centre of the stones to appreciate the beauty of the sun spreading its red and hues against the blue of the sky and grey of the stones.

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Exhibitions

Wondering why do stones arranged in a particular alignment interest people across the globe? To resolve your inquisitivity, visit the Salisbury Museum and Wiltshire museum. Feel yourself immersing into the story of the Stonehenges, the landscapes, the people and the various meanings of the structure of the stones. The story of these stones which hold a historical and cultural significance is told through a powerful combination of cutting-edge audio-visual techniques to deliver an unforgettable memory to cherish. On walking around the museum you would discover a treasure of more than 250 incredible objects of the past ranging from jewellery, pottery and ancient tools.

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Stonehenge
Stone Circle

Visit the magnificent and antique site of Stonehenge in the evening to take a stroll around it and marvel over the techniques used by ancestors in building it,since it is a must do on the journey to Stonehenge London. Walk on the outer edge around the mounds and potholes, while your guide informs you that the site would originally serve the purpose of a graveyard. But, this story isn’t a whole piece of history as historians themselves are puzzled by all plausible activities the ancestors might have been performing around the site. Take a break off your stroll around the sarsens to behold the beauty of the setting sun which multifolds when seen from behind it. The ambience under the sparkling of the setting sun holds a spiritual positive energy which can be felt deep inside bones rejuvenating spirits. While sauntering around, the guide would surprise you with their knowledge of semiotics and engineering of the standing masterpiece.

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FAQs

How old is Stonehenge?

One of the most ancient and renowned prehistoric monuments, Stonehenge London is 5,000 years old. It was built around 2500 BCE in the Neolithic period in several stages, the last construction happening around 700 BCE.

What is the best time to visit Stonehenge?

The best time to take a stroll around Stonehenge London is during the early morning hours or late evening hours. The engineering of the monument is such that it traces the movement of the sun and other planets. The beauty of dawn and dusk enhances multifolds when experienced standing behind sarsens and taking a stone circle around. The positive and inspiring energy felt during this time is worth troubling yourself in the early morning.

How far is Stonehenge from London?

The monumental site of Stonehenge is located in the English county of Wiltshire about 145 km away from the city of London in the westward direction. The journey takes around 2 hours if travelling by road or an hour and half by train.

What is special about Stonehenge?

Stonhenge England is a prehistoric monument site whose history still puzzles the historians. The techniques that might have been used by the ancestors adds charm to the engineering and science of the site. The special characteristics of the monument is reflected in the ability of ancestors who erected sarens upright in an alignment that traces the movement of the sun, moon and other planets.

Do we have to book in advance to get entry to Stonehenge?

No, it’s not compulsory to pre-book your visit to the monument but it’s highly advisable to do so. Online booking in advance won’t only ensure a convenient trip by cutting the trouble of standing in long queues off your list. It would also make the process easier and quicker by providing more than one payment option as well as discount coupons. Make sure that you check the refund and cancellation policy before completing the payment, confirmation tickets would be mailed within a few hours of successful payment.

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